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1 minute ago - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Go to space in the Future at Thinktank

On Level 3 of Thinktank Birmingham Science Museum is The Future. All about space and the Thinktank Planetarium is up here! This visit was during April 2014. See an astronaut, an alien, robots and more! Get the lift up there, or go up the stairs. An idea for a Planetarium goes back to when one was proposed for what is now Centenary Square (1941 model). This one in Eastside opened in 2001.

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Go to space in the Future at Thinktank





On Level 3 of Thinktank Birmingham Science Museum is The Future. All about space and the Thinktank Planetarium is up here! This visit was during April 2014. See an astronaut, an alien, robots and more! Get the lift up there, or go up the stairs. An idea for a Planetarium goes back to when one was proposed for what is now Centenary Square (1941 model). This one in Eastside opened in 2001.


THE FUTURE AT THINKTANK

Space, the Final Frontier, these are the voyages of the Starship Birmingham, it's continuing mission, to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilisations, to boldly go where no one has gone before!

Located on Level 3 at Thinktank Birmingham Science Museum in Millennium Point is an area called The Future. I went up there during the April 2014 visit to Thinktank. Using our free Thinktank vouchers, took advantage during 2014 while it was still valid. But you have to wear a wristband. I didn't get around to going up to The Future the year before in April 2013.

 

The area is now called Find the Future. But expect that it is the same exhibits as 6 years earlier. And many of it would have been placed here back in 2001 when the museum opened.

Below is the description on the Thinktank website:

Explore the outer reaches of space, get to grips with innovative inventions and marvel at how medical advancements are saving lives. Head to Talking Point to consider scientists’ predictions for the future – and have your say!

The Futures gallery brings to life how science, technology and medicine have a huge impact on the way we live - now and in the future.

With interactive exhibits such as Create an Alien and RoboThespian, the Futures gallery aims to stimulate debate, explore scientific issues and question our place in the Universe.

 

The Planetarium now has a 4K system, but at the time of our visit in 2014 they still had the old 2001 version (it was voiced I think by former BBC Midlands Today presenter Sue Beardsmore).

This is the description for the Planeterium on the Thinktank website:

Step inside Thinktank’s Planetarium and explore the outer reaches of space, get up close to constellations, journey through the night-sky and adventure through the solar system!

In addition to astronomy, there will be shows that allow you to travel through the human body; dive under the ocean; shrink to the size of an atom or allow yourself to be immersed completely in music and light.

 

There could have been an even earlier Planetarium built in what is now Centenary Square. As seen in this model made in 1941. It would have been located close to Broad Street approximately where Symphony Hall is now. But due to World War 2, this plan was abandoned, and only Baskerville House (completed in 1938) and the Hall of Memory (opened in 1925) were built in the end. Birmingham wouldn't get a Planeterium until Thinktank opened in Millennium Point in 2001! Saw the model at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre during an open day in May 2012.

After the war, Roman Imperial imagery went out of fashion, so this plan for a civic square never came to be. The proposed planetarium would have been to the far left of the Broad Street site.

Birds-eye view of the model where the proposed Planetarium would have been located. The model was made by William Haywood, who was Secretary of The Birmingham Civic Society. In the end, it would another 60 years before a Planetarium would open at Thinktank in Millennium Point.

 

Now for a tour of The Future from my visit during April 2014.

First view of The Future after heading up the stairs to Level 3. Saw these yellow tubes in the centre of the room. They might be just below the Planetarium.

The outside of the Planetarium. When inside, it's a bit like sitting in a cinema, but looking up at the ceiling with all the changing images of the solar system and the planets and beyond!

This part was called the Future of Space. With an image of the planet Earth on it.

They had a full astronaut suit on display. Probably from the European Space Agency if not from NASA.

The front of the astronaut's suit. Could do with a helmet right now! That would protect you from the glare from the sun.

A look at RoboThespian. It was an anamatronic.

Close up look at the top half of RoboThespian.

Saw this Mars Rover on a recreation of the surface of the Martian planet. A bit like what NASA would send there.

An alien with 9 eyes! This was an animation that kept changing. Imagining what aliens could look like?

They had a couple of Gyroscopes on display. They look like remote controlled helicopters. Before drones was invented.

A moving robot arm. This is a screenshot from the video I took, as the only photo I got of it, showed it in motion while it was moving. It looks like the robot arm was drumming on a drum kit.

Futher displays in The Future. All sections here was interactive with a touchscreen. And behind the objects was screens explaining what the object was all about.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Transport
07 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Classic Car Collection in the garage at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre

The last area of your visit to the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre is in the large garage. Where they store many classic cars from various different eras. Many made all over the West Midlands. From Rover's to Austin's to the earliest cars from the beginning of the 20th century. Some of these cars might be in Thinktank now. I first saw them on an open day I went to in May 2012.

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Classic Car Collection in the garage at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre





The last area of your visit to the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre is in the large garage. Where they store many classic cars from various different eras. Many made all over the West Midlands. From Rover's to Austin's to the earliest cars from the beginning of the 20th century. Some of these cars might be in Thinktank now. I first saw them on an open day I went to in May 2012.


Here we will look at the classic cars in the collection of the Birmingham Museums Trust (originally Birmingham City Council). The following photos were taken during a May 2012 open day I went to. So when I went again 6 years later in September 2018, I didn't take these cars again (apart from if I saw them at Thinktank in 2013 or 2014). These cars were seen in the large garage at the Birmingham Museum Collection Centre on Dollman Street in Nechells.

The following vehicles below date from about 1900 until 1985.

Carriage

I had no details about this carriage. But assume it dates to before the 20th century, and probably needed horses to pull it.

Benz Voiturette

This Dogcart was built in 1900 to Karl Benz's system. It took part in the inaugural 'Brighton Run' and also again in 2003 despite the appalling weather. Benz first made a motorcar in 1883. He retired in 1903, but remained on the board, even after the company merged with DMG in 1926. He was still on the board at the time of his death in 1929 by which time the company was now called the Daimler-Benz corporation.

Clement Panhard

This Clément-Panhard automobile was built in 1901 or 1902, it was registered in 1904. This light car was marketed in England as the 'Stirling Dog Cart'. The automobile manufacturer started in 1898. The owner of the company was Adolphe Clément. Was probably made in France.

Jackson Motor Car

This car was built in 1909 by Jackson / De Dion. It was a single cylinder wagonette. The Jackson Automobile Company was an American Brass Era automobile manufacturer located and named for Jackson, Michigan, USA. They produced the Jackson from 1903 until 1923. The De Dion-Bouton was a French automobile manufacturer making cars from 1883 until 1953. It was founded by Jules-Albert de Dion, Georges Bouton and Charles Trépardoux. It was probably a Jackson automobile with a De Dion engine.

B.S.A. Open Tourer

This was a 4 seater car built by B.S.A. in 1912 at the Sparkbrook Works. The car had the legendary Knight Double Sleeve Valve engine. It was one of the earliest uses steel panels in motor cars. The Birmingham Small Arms Company started out in 1861 making machine guns in the Gun Quarter. By 1880 they started to make bicycles. They moved to Sparkbrook in 1906 and started making motorcycles in 1910. They started making cars from 1907. The company went out of business in 1973.

Castle Runabout (Prototype)

This prototype was made in 1919 and was the 4 wheeled version. It never reached full production. The Castle Motor Company of Kidderminster made about 350 3 wheeled 'Runabout' light cars known as the Castle Three from 1919 until 1922.

Singer 10 H.P. Coupe

Made in 1920 by Singer Motors. It was Model C. 1124cc. The company under George Singer originally made bicycles, before they started making motorcycles. They became the 3rd largest car builder behind Austin and Morris.

Ariel Convertible Car

Made in 1924 with an Ariel 4 cylinder engine. The Ariel works was based in Selly Oak and they built over 1000 cars from 1923 until 1925. When they switched to making motorcycles as they were priced out of the market by the Austin Seven. Ariel existed from 1902 until they were sold to BSA in 1970. They were based in the Bournbrook area. Today the name is remembered in Selly Oak with the Ariel Aqueduct, which was built in 2011 near the former site of the Battery works.

Bean 14HP Coupe

This car was built in Tipton in 1927. It was a 4 Cylinder, 2385cc, Coupe. The Beans Foundry survived to make engine blocks for other car manufacturers (but production ceased in 2005 and was closed in 6 months by the administrators). Bean made cars from 1919 until 1931 by A Harper Sons & Bean, Ltd at factories in Dudley and Coseley.

Ford Model A Saloon

The Ford Model A was probably made in Manchester in 1928. It had a 1626cc 4 cylinder engine. Most of it's 'working' life was spent in the London area. It was also known as a Tudor sedan (in the US) or a Tudor saloon (in the UK).

Daimler 20 Saloon

Was built in Coventry in 1931. It had a 20 HP engine, with a six cylinder sleeve valve engine, pre-selector gearbox and a fluid flywheel. At the time it would have cost more than £750.

M.G. Midget (J Series)

M.G. built this J2 sports car in 1933. It had an 847cc Engine. It was developed from the Morris Minor. It was restored to working order my museum staff and has been seen on the roads. I saw it a year later in April 2013 at Thinktank in the Move It section. M.G. began producing cars in 1924 by William Morris in Oxford. It has had many owners over the years. Including: British Leyland, Austin Rover, Rover Group, MG Rover Group and more recently the Nanjing Automobile Group until 2011. The current company MG Motor had been producing cars at Longbridge since 2012 and is owned by SAIC Motor UK.

Armstrong Siddeley - 'Foursome'

The chassis of this car was made in Coventry in 1935 but the car was finished in Birmingham. It had a 17HP, 6 cylinder engine.

Rover 12 Sports

It was built in Coventry in 1936 and was a 12HP Sports Saloon typical of later designs available with three different engine capacity engines, the 10, 12 and 14HP.

Austin A90 Atlantic

The A90 'Atlantic' Coupe was made in 1949 by Austin at Longbridge. It drove continuously for 7 days and nights, taking 63 American stock car records. It was the first British car to attempt the American National Stock Car Record at the Indianapolis Speedway. It was owned by the Birmingham Museum of Science & Industry. So probably been in storage at BMCC since 1997 (as no room at Thinktank).

Heinkel 'Cabin Cruiser'

Also called Heinkel Kabine. This was a 3 Wheeled Bubble Car built in 1958. The door of the vehicle opens at the front. It owes much to aircraft technology. The company started in Germany making aircraft. After the war they were prohibited from making planes, so had to make cars. It is possible that this one was made in Ireland under licence to the Dundalk Engineering Company.

Riley 'Elf' (sectioned)

Similar to a Mini. It dates to 1961. The boot in the Riley 'Elf' was slightly larger than a Mini. It had a walnut veneered fascia. It was sectioned by Austin Apprentices. Saw it again displayed at Thinktank in the area called We Made It during April 2013.

Rover 2000

Built in Solihull in 1964. It has a 2 Litre engine and was a Manual car. It was one of the new style 'Rovers'. Triumph almost built a similar model to this one.

Rover P5B Automatic

This car was built by Rover in Solihull in 1971. It has a 3.5 Litre engine. It was restored to it's concours by it's former owner.  The P5B has a 3528cc V8 engine (which was in production from 1967 until 1973). The mileage at the time it was donated to the museum's collection was at 45,462.

Rover SD1 Automatic

Built in Solihull during 1981. It has a 3.5 litre engine. It was returned to concours condition by it's former owner.

It was the last model made by Rover before they linked up with Honda. I later saw it again a year later at Thinktank in an area called Move It, during April 2013.

Sinclair C5 Tricycle

Technically not a car. The Sinclair C5 was built in 1985 by Hoover Washing Machines, in Merthyr Tydfil, Wales. It was a 12 volt electric vehicle and was considered a novelty and unsafe by the majority of other motorists. It could be bought from Woolworths for £399 with a £29 delivery fee. It was capable of 15 miles per hour, the maximum speed allowed without a licence. Designed by Sir Clive Sinclair, he was known for the ZX Spectrum computer. He was ahead of time with an electric vehicle. Sadly it wasn't very successful and only being available by mail order was a mistake. As customers couldn't inspect it in shops before purchasing it.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Transport
23 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Airlines gone but not forgotten at Birmingham Airport: Thomas Cook Airlines

Another airline popular for holiday destinations was Thomas Cook Airlines. Sadly they went out of business back in September 2019, along with all of their High Street travel shops. Founded in 2007 from a merger with Thomas Cook Group and MyTravel Group. It operated services from Birmingham Airport and other UK based airports. They were known for the yellow heart symbol.

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Airlines gone but not forgotten at Birmingham Airport: Thomas Cook Airlines





Another airline popular for holiday destinations was Thomas Cook Airlines. Sadly they went out of business back in September 2019, along with all of their High Street travel shops. Founded in 2007 from a merger with Thomas Cook Group and MyTravel Group. It operated services from Birmingham Airport and other UK based airports. They were known for the yellow heart symbol.


Thomas Cook at Birmingham Airport

Thomas Cook Airlines operated flights from Birmingham Airport for many years. Founded in 2007 from a merger between Thomas Cook Group and MyTravel Group. There main bases was at Manchester Airport and Gatwick Airport . In 2013, Thomas Cook Airlines, Thomas Cook Airlines Belgium, Thomas Cook Airlines Scandinavia and Condor all merged under the name of Thomas Cook Group Airlines.

The airline collapsed in September 2019. Over 165,000 passengers were stranded overseas (more than the 65,000 of Monarch), that had to be flown back to the UK.

While I've seen Thomas Cook at Birmingham Airport, we had never flown with them.

 

One of my first Thomas Cook plane photos was taken while I was on a walk around Erdington. I was on the Chester Road during May 2014. It was probably an Airbus A321-200.

Not a great photo of a Thomas Cook plane, as it was behind trees as it came into land at Birmingham Airport, back in March 2016. But this was on the day of the first Emirates Airbus A380 landing. And I went to the Sheldon Country Park to see it. After I left I went to Marston Green Station, and got this view from the second footbridge before I got to the platform.

The first up and close photo I got of a Thomas Cook plane was at the departures at Birmingham Airport during June 2016. The windows to the gates can be a bit fuzzy to look through. A Shell tanker was near the Airbus A321-200 plane. We were on the way to get a Flybe flight to Milan for the Lake Como holiday.

In December 2016, I saw this Thomas Cook plane taking off from Birmingham Airport, while I was in Car Park 5. There is a plane spotting area there, but if you go further back, you won't have the perimeter fence in the way.

Back in August 2017 I was in Sutton Coldfield on the Big Sleuth bear hunt. While in Boldmere (after leaving Sutton Park) I saw this Thomas Cook Airbus A321-200 plane.

Later back at Sutton Coldfield Station (August 2017), I saw this Thomas Cook plane coming into land at Birmingham Airport. Sutton Coldfield is on the flight path into the airport. Was also an Airbus A321-200.

A close up view of this Thomas Cook plane during June 2018 at Birmingham Airport. In departures, heading to the gate to get a Jet2 flight to Pisa in Italy, for the Florence and Tuscany holiday. Another Airbus A321-200. Behind was several Flybe planes.

Another good station for seeing planes taking off or landing from Birmingham Airport was Stechford Station. I saw this Thomas Cook plane from Stechford during October 2018. Also an Airbus A321-200. This one was taking off.

Also in October 2018 was the visit to Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens, where I saw several planes coming into land at Birmingham Airport. This one was an Airbus A320-200.

It may have also been with Condor at the time. It left the UK Thomas Cook fleet during 2018 (the Airbus A320-200's).

Back in August 2019 was when I last saw Thomas Cook planes at Birmingham Airport. This view was from the X1 National Express West Midlands Platinum bus I'd caught from South Yardley to the airport. At the time there was also a pair of TUI planes to the left.

I popped into Car Park 5 where I saw this Thomas Cook Airbus A321-200. The last time I would see it there before the airline went bust in the following month.

Now for a bonus photo.

In May 2011 having just landed at Nice Airport in Frane with BMI Baby, I saw this pair of Thomas Cook Belgium planes (before I got off the BMI Baby plane). This airline was founded in 2001, started operating from 2002 and ceased operating in 2017. These were Airbus A320-200's. The planes were later transferred to other airlines, including one to the UK based Thomas Cook Airlines.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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50 passion points
Transport
16 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

The Class 168 on the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill to Leamington Spa

Chiltern Railways operates the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill (or Moor Street) towards London Marylebone. Their main diesel multiple unit trains are the Class 168 Clubman. They do also use Class 68 with Mark 3 carriages, but here we will be looking at the Class 168 from Birmingham Snow Hill towards Leamington Spa. Stopping at Solihull and Warwick Parkway.

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The Class 168 on the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill to Leamington Spa





Chiltern Railways operates the Chiltern Mainline from Birmingham Snow Hill (or Moor Street) towards London Marylebone. Their main diesel multiple unit trains are the Class 168 Clubman. They do also use Class 68 with Mark 3 carriages, but here we will be looking at the Class 168 from Birmingham Snow Hill towards Leamington Spa. Stopping at Solihull and Warwick Parkway.


I've not been on a train since lockdown came into force during late March 2020. Before then I went on the Chiltern Mainline from Solihull to Leamington Spa at the end of February 2020 (to go on the branch line to Coventry). The last time I went to Solihull Station in the middle of March 2020 was get some trains to Aston (to see the turnable in Eastside).

The photos below were taken between 2009 and early 2020.

Chiltern Railways have been running the Chiltern Railways franchise since 1996. The mainline is between Birmingham Snow Hill and London Marylebone. In late 2010, the terminus platforms 3 and 4 were restored to Birmingham Moor Street Station, and many Chiltern trains now terminate there.

The Class 168 Clubman DMU trains were built between 1998 and 2004. They were refurbished in 2007-8 and from 2013 onwards. There is 4 types of Class 168. The

  • 168/0 (built in 1998)
  • 168/1 (built in 2000)
  • 168/2 (built in 2004)
  • 168/3 (built in 2000 as Class 170 for TransPennine Express)

Birmingham Snow Hill Station

Seen at platform 2 during September 2013 was Chiltern Railways 168216. It would form a service to London Marylebone. Seen in it's new livery at Birmingham Snow Hill Station, while I was at platform 3.

Chiltern Railways 168002 had just arrived at platform 2 at Snow Hill Station during November 2014, having come from London Marylebone. One of the oldest trains in the fleet, in it's new livery.

Chiltern Railways 168217 was seen at platform 2 at Birmingham Snow Hill Station during May 2016. From my usual view from platform 3. In the new standard grey livery.

Seen inside of Birmingham Snow Hill Station at platform 2, during December 2017 was Chiltern Railways 168 329. It would form the Chiltern Mainline service to London Marylebone. This was one of the trains that Chiltern inherited from TransPennine Express, which used to be a Class 170, before it was converted.

Birmingham Moor Street Station

Seen at platform 4 at Birmingham Moor Street Station during November 2011, was Chiltern Railways 168108. Behind was Selfridges, the Rotunda and what used to be the Pavilions (which it was at the time). The old blue livery would last a few more years after this. These restored platforms opened at the end of 2010. Part of Chiltern's Evergreen 3 project (during Phase 1).

Chiltern Railways 168110 was seen at platform 4 during April 2015 in the new grey livery. The inside of these trains had been refurbished as well. Can just about see Selfridges from here.

Arriving at platform 3 at Birmingham Moor Street during December 2017 was Chiltern Railways 168004. In the new grey livery, but was looking a bit dirty at the time.

In January 2020 from platform 1 at Birmingham Moor Street. Chiltern Railways 168106 had just left Birmingham Snow Hill. And after a stop at Moor Street, was heading on it's way to it's next stop at Solihull, on it's way towards London Marylebone.

Solihull Station

Departing Solihull Station during May 2013 was Chiltern Railways 168216. At the front was also Chiltern Railways 172 103. It was heading to London Marylebone. In the old blue livery.

In December 2013, I was at Solihull Station when I saw Chiltern Railways 168108. It was heading for Birmingham Moor Street (which would be it's final stop and terminus).

In May 2016 at Solihull, I saw Chiltern Railways 168218 heading towards London Marylebone. It was a wet weekend, and this might have been a Wembley Special weekend (the FA Cup Final was that weekend at the time). I've been on a Chiltern train when it's been packed full of football fans going down to Wembley.

In July 2019 an unidentified Chiltern Railways Class 168 is seen crossing the Low Bridge on Blossomfield Road in Solihull. While a pair of buses cross under it towards Solihull Town Centre. I had just got off the no 6 bus, which was the red single decker bus on the right. The bus with NXWM was 1914. Landflight bus on the left was on the 8W.

Warwick Parkway Station

I got the train down from Solihull to Warwick in April 2019, and walked up the Grand Union Canal. Getting off near Warwick Parkway Station. This was my first time using the station, although I've passed through it many times in the past. Seen departing from Warwick Parkway for London Marylebone was Chiltern Railways 168 323 and 168 321.

Both Chiltern Railways 168 323 and 168 321 had been part of the former TransPennine Express fleet (it ended in 2016) that used to be Class 170, before they were refurbished and change to a Class 168/3.

After a wait at Warwick Parkway, Chiltern Railways 168 326 arrived at the station.

Chiltern Railways 168 326 would be my ride back to Solihull from Warwick Parkway. Sit in the Quiet Zone. It is so comfortable on these trains.

Leamington Spa Station

Back in October 2011, I got the train down to Leamington Spa Station for the first time for a photo walk around the town. Seen at the opposite platform was Chiltern Railways 168112. After stopping at Leamington Spa, it would resume it's journey down to London Marylebone.

In March 2018 on another visit to Leamington Spa Station, I saw Chiltern Railways 168108. This was the first time I had got a train from Coventry to Leamington, going past Kenilworth (which hadn't opened at the time). I would go back when Kenilworth Station opened for the first time. Meanwhile this Chiltern train was heading down to London Marylebone after a stop at Leamington Spa.

On Leap Year Day at the end of February 2020, I caught a packed Chiltern Railways train down to Leamington Spa from Solihull (heading to Coventry on the branch line). Got off before the train got too busy with football fans. Chiltern Railways 168215 seen heading on it's way down to London Marylebone. That day, Chiltern should have put two trains on of 8 carriages. But was only a crowded four carriages.

After I got back to Leamington Spa from Coventry (with Cross Country, as would have been a long wait for West Midlands Railway), Chiltern Railways 168003 arrived, and it would take me back to Solihull. Much quieter and less busier. This was the last time I travelled with Chiltern Railways before lockdown and the current restrictions.

From the 15th June 2020, if you travel on the train (or bus) you have to wear a mask over your mouth and nose. But travel is still "essential travel only". So I don't know when I'll be going on a train, or even a bus again (any time soon). Not been on either in 3 months now (since March 2020).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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50 passion points
Squares and public spaces
15 Jun 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square on the August Bank Holiday Monday 2019

On Monday 26th August 2019, I was changing buses from the 50 to 11A, when I spotted a Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square near All Saints Church, so went to check it out, before walking to the next 11A bus stop on the Vicarage Road. Was a variety of classic cars there that day. It was the August Bank Holiday Monday.

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The Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square on the August Bank Holiday Monday 2019





On Monday 26th August 2019, I was changing buses from the 50 to 11A, when I spotted a Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square near All Saints Church, so went to check it out, before walking to the next 11A bus stop on the Vicarage Road. Was a variety of classic cars there that day. It was the August Bank Holiday Monday.


Classic Car Meet at Kings Heath Village Square

Kings Heath Village Square opened in October 2011, and is suitable for any kind of event. During normal times, the square was available for hire. The square is at the corner of Vicarage Road and High Street in Kings Heath near All Saints Church.

On Monday the 26th August 2019, it was the August Bank Holiday Monday, and one such event was using the square. There was a Classic Car Meet on that day.

I had got off the no 50 bus and was going to switch to an 11A when I spotted this car meet and went to check it out before getting my bus home that day.

This view was taken from the 11A bus as it waited at the lights. Wythall Transport Museum were also having their usual Bank Holiday Weekend heritage bus rides up and down the Alcester Road. There was an old Metrobus to the right. Which I didn't notice until I first saw this photo on my computer.

When I first arrived I saw this Ford F 150 pick up truck, made in 1977. It originally came from Texas.

Another view of the Ford F150 from the 11A bus.

This is a Austin Six from 1929.

This Riley Elf was near the bushes close to Vicarage Road.

This old car was either a Rover 2000 or the Rover P6.

Various old cars near the All Saints Centre including the T48 Corsa Spyder.

A line of about 5 classic cars. The red car to the left was a 1977 Triumph Stag Mk II.

On the Labyrinth in the middle of the square at the time was this live band. With a drum kit and a guitar.

Close to All Saints Church was a 1966 Volvo Amazon.

The orange car with the boot open was a 1972 MGB GT.

Next up was this Volkswagen Type 2.

A classic Volkswagen Beetle

For a similar post click: Austin Seven's in Victoria Square (April 2012).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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