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Elliott Brown Transport
21 Jun 2021 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

WM 6600 bus in Walsall

On Saturday 19th June 2021, National Express West Midlands had a vintage bus rally around the Black Country. From Walsall to Wolverhampton. I travelled up to Walsall by train and went to Walsall Arboretum. After leaving, I only saw the WM 6600 bus on Broadway North, before it went up Littleton Street East. I did not spot any other heritage buses around.

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WM 6600 bus in Walsall





On Saturday 19th June 2021, National Express West Midlands had a vintage bus rally around the Black Country. From Walsall to Wolverhampton. I travelled up to Walsall by train and went to Walsall Arboretum. After leaving, I only saw the WM 6600 bus on Broadway North, before it went up Littleton Street East. I did not spot any other heritage buses around.


WM Travel bus 6600

I was aware of National Express West Midlands having a vintage bus rally in the Black Country. This included their modern buses in the heritage liveries. This was on Saturday 19th June 2021.

Got the train up to Walsall Station, and walked to Walsall Arboretum. After a walk around the park, I exited from the Arboretum Lodge that I entered earier, I saw a vintage bus on Broadway North.

 

I quickly got some photos of it while it was at the traffic lights, but was a car in the way.

dndimg alt="WM 6600 bus" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WM 6600 Walsall (Jun 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There was no time to wait for the car to move out of the way.

dndimg alt="WM 6600 bus" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WM 6600 Walsall (Jun 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Was able to get one more shot of the bus with licence plate no: NOC 600R as it passed the lights. With route 39 on the rear. It was heading onto Littleton Street East. These roads are part of the Walsall ring road.

dndimg alt="WM 6600 bus" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WM 6600 Walsall (Jun 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

I'd previously seen the same bus (WM Travel 6600, NOC 600R) at the Yardley Wood Bus Garage open day, back in November 2018. When it was displaying as route 74 to Wednesbury via Wednesbury (The modern 74 bus route goes from Birmingham to Dudley via West Bromwich).

dndimg alt="Yardley Wood bus garage 2018" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Yardley Wood Bus Garage Open Day 2018 (2) .jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Look out for a Walsall Arboretum post coming soon!

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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70 passion points
Elliott Brown Classic Architecture
09 Jun 2021 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

The original Curzon Street Station (1838 to 1893 / 1966)

Did you know that the first railway passenger station in Birmingham was opened at Curzon Street in 1838? Built by the London & Birmingham Railway, engineered by Robert Stephenson. The building was designed by the architect Philip Hardwick. It's time as the Birmingham terminus was shortlived after New Street opened in 1854. But continued for excursions to 1893 / goods to 1966.

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The original Curzon Street Station (1838 to 1893 / 1966)





Did you know that the first railway passenger station in Birmingham was opened at Curzon Street in 1838? Built by the London & Birmingham Railway, engineered by Robert Stephenson. The building was designed by the architect Philip Hardwick. It's time as the Birmingham terminus was shortlived after New Street opened in 1854. But continued for excursions to 1893 / goods to 1966.


Curzon Street Station

(1838 - passengers 1893 / goods 1966)

The first passenger railway linking London to Birmingham was opened in 1838. From London Euston to Birmingham Curzon Street. The station was originally called simply Birmingham Station (it was renamed Birmingham Curzon Street Station in 1852 after Birmingham New Street Station was being built and opened in 1854).

It was the terminus for both the London & Birmingham Railway and the Grand Junction Railway, with lines from London, Manchester and Liverpool.

The station located at New Canal Street and Curzon Street in what we now call Eastside, was first opened in June 1838, and the first passenger train arrived from London on the 17th September 1838. The station also had platforms for parcels, but there was no through trains.

The architect of the station was Philip Hardwick, while Robert Stephenson was the engineer in charge of building the line from London to Birmingham. The building was inspired by classical Roman architecture, following Hardwick's trip to Italy in 1818-19.

 

The following image shows Curzon Street Station as it was in 1838. It was published by E C & W Osborne and printed by E Y Moody Bros.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/2002V6 Curzon Street Station Birmingham 1838.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The next sketch shows Curzon Street from New Canal Street in 1839. It was an Engraving from Topographical Views  in Wilkinson Collection Vol iii.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1996V145.12 Birmingham Station Curzon Street.jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A more recent drawing of Curzon Street Station dated 1950. It was an ink drawing by John L. Baker. Topographical view of Birmingham. By then the station was only being used for goods. It closed in 1966.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/1996V86 Curzon Street Station Birmingham.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /> Images above are free to download from the Birmingham Museums Trust collection, Public Domain. Digital Image Resource. Creative Commons Zero Licence (CCO).

 

The coming of New Street Station to the closure of Curzon Street Station

The problem was that Curzon Street was not centrally located to the centre of town. So the railway companies decided to build a new station in the heard of the town centre. This would become Birmingham New Street Station, and it's first incarnation opened in 1854. Many services were transferred away from Curzon Street at the time. The station was modified at Banbury Street and New Canal Street by 1874, and was used from Easter that year for passenger excursion trips. Which it continued to do so, until it closed by Easter 1893. Such as on public bank holidays to Sutton Coldfield. The old 1838 platforms were not used as much by then.

Going into the 20th Century, the station continued to be used for goods until it closed for good in 1966. The platforms and original good sheds were demolished in the same year. The site was then used as a Parcelforce depot until that closed in 2006.

In the years before HS2 the land behind the station building was used as a public surface car park, and at one point could have been a redevelopment site called Curzone (which never happened in the end). The HS2 announcement in 2009 changed everything.

The surviving building became a Grade I listed building in 1952. At one point it was modified in 1839 to become a hotel called the Victoria. In 1841 a hotel extension was built and this was the Queen's Hotel. It was on Curzon Street. It was later renamed to The Railway Hotel, when another Queen's Hotel opened at New Street. The hotel at Curzon Street closed in 1900 and was demolished by 1980.

The council purchased the station building from British Rail in 1979 and was used by a University of Birmingham student group called 'Three Bugs Fringe Theatre'.

 

Plaques

Inside of Curzon Street Station is this plaque installed during 1947, which was the Centenary Year of the founding of The Institution of Mechanical Engineers on this site on the 27th January 1847. Photo taken in June 2014, during a visit to Birmingham's Hidden Spaces at Curzon Street Station.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The building also received a Civic Trust Award in 1983. This was probably after Curzon Street Station was restored in the late 1970s and early 1980s (after it had fell into disrepair by 1979). Also seen at Birmingham's Hidden Spaces.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (4).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

There is a plaque on the front of the building that was placed on the New Canal Street side of the building in 1988, on the 150th anniversary of the arrival of the first train from London to Birmingham on Monday 17th September 1838. Photo below taken in April 2009. It is now longer possible to see this plaque while HS2 build their new station.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Apr 2009) (3).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Curzon Street Station - exterior of the building 2009 to 2021

Now a gallery of photos of Curzon Street Station taken over the last 12 years or so.

 

View of Curzon Street Station from New Canal Street, taken April 2009. Millennium Point can be seen to the left.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Apr 2009) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A view taken during August 2009 of Curzon Street Station from a now lost road called Bartholomew Street. By then it had long since been closed off. And would disappear by 2011-12 when Eastside City Park was built.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Aug 2009) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

It is now January 2010, and Curzon Street Station can again be seen from Bartholomew Street, but in the snow. The Woodman public house seen on the left.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Jan 2010) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By February 2011, I was having a look at Curzon Street Station from the public car park on Curzon Street. All the windows and doors were boarded up. The Rotunda and Pavilions shopping centre were visible to the left of here. Sometimes this car park had been used for the odd fun fair over the years.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Feb 2011).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

The hoardings on the left have not gone up for HS2, but for the building of Eastside City Park. Curzon Street Station seen from New Canal Street during September 2011.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Sep 2011) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

As late as March 2014, the site behind the old Curzon Street Station building was still being used as a public car park. Selfridges, Beetham Tower, Centre City Tower and the Rotunda were visible on the skyline at the time.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Mar 2014).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By March 2017, it was clear that HS2 would soon take over the building. Hoarding artwork and banners had gone up. It was planned that Curzon Street would become a new cultural hub. The art was from a HS2 / BCU competition, which was won by Sarina Kaur, called Curzon Railway 1838 - 1966.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Mar 2017) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By March 2020, and before the first lockdown, one last walk down New Canal Street before HS2 closed it off, it was also one last chance to see the Eagle & Tun pub before it was demolished. By then the Curzon Railway BCU art banners had been taken down, but the hoardings were still there.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Mar 2020).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

A view from the train of Curzon Street Station during August 2020. After the first lockdown restrictions were being eased, I got a train from Stechford to Birmingham New Street. New Canal Street is now closed off, you can also see Millennium Point and The Woodman.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Aug 2020) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

October 2020 from Curzon Street. The road beyond was closed by HS2. Was taking a pedestrian diversion from Digbeth to Eastside the long way around (via Lawley Middleway). As HS2 had cut off my old routes. This was before the second lockdown began.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Oct 2020) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

By April 2021, the third lockdown restrictions were being eased, and got the train to Birmingham Moor Street for a walk around Eastside and Digbeth. This time via the Digbeth Branch Canal (which was faster than the route I took the autumn before). Took this view of Curzon Street Station from the canal.  The land all being prepared by HS2. The view might be lost in the future once the station is built, and it might bridge over the canal as well (not like the original brick Curzon Street Tunnel that crosses the canal towards New Street in Eastside).

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Station (Apr 2021).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Early June 2021, and a view of Curzon Street Station taken from the Cross City Line, I caught the train at Birmingham New Street and got it to Sutton Coldfield. It looks like the turntable (to the far right of here) has been filled in. It's hard to imagine the other buildings that was here over 180 years ago. Millennium Point seen behind from the train. HS2 is a hive of activity.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Curzon St Stn HS2 (Jun 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

For more photos and the feature, go here for the full gallery of Curzon Street Station in Birmingham Gems.

 

Birmingham's Hidden Spaces, June 2014

From the 21st to 29th June 2014, Birmingham's Hidden Spaces opened up Curzon Street Station to the public. It was an exhibition by Associated Architects, and in association with the Birmingham Post. I saw it on the 28th June 2014. This banner was on the outside of the building.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (1).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Inside the main foyer and a look up the staircase to the ceiling. Unfortunately it was too unsafe to go upstairs, so you could only see the ground floor and basement of the building.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (2).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Zooming up to the ceiling window.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (8).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

This sign shows A Brief History of Curzon Street Station. Similar to the information I have presented above.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (5).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Another sign about Curzon Street Station built 1838. Philip Hardwick, architect, Robert Stephenson, engineer. Plus the restoration task force in 1983.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (7).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

Going down the steps to the basement, would have been an exhibition on down here.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (6).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

The rear door was open, so you could have a look outside. There wasn't much to see out there.

dndimg alt="Curzon Street Station" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/BHS Curzon St Stn (Jun 2014) (9).JPG" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Modern 21st Century photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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Elliott Brown Transport
04 May 2021 - Elliott Brown
News & Updates

Westside Metro extension from Hagley Road to Broad Street - Late April 2021 update

With lockdown restrictions being eased, I was able to back on the bus again for the first time in around 4 months. Again got the no 1 bus to Harborne Road in Edgbaston, and walked around Highfield Road to the start of the Westside Metro extension outside of 54 Hagley Road. Pitstop at Starbucks, bit of rain, and had my coffee on the walk down Broad Street.

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Westside Metro extension from Hagley Road to Broad Street - Late April 2021 update





With lockdown restrictions being eased, I was able to back on the bus again for the first time in around 4 months. Again got the no 1 bus to Harborne Road in Edgbaston, and walked around Highfield Road to the start of the Westside Metro extension outside of 54 Hagley Road. Pitstop at Starbucks, bit of rain, and had my coffee on the walk down Broad Street.


A walk down Hagley Road and Broad Street on the morning of Thursday 29th April 2021. The third lockdown over the last four months meant I was unable to travel into the City Centre (other than by car). I did once pass this area in the car (as a passenger) going to and from Edgbaston Reservoir. But with lockdown restrictions being eased again, I'm able to ride trains and buses again. Got the no 1 to the Harborne Road terminus in Edgbaston, and walked down to Highfield Road (instead of taking the Morrisons shortcut). To get to the Hagley Road and walk towards Fifty4 Hagley Road.

 

Edgbaston Village

This is the site of what might be called Edgbaston Village Tram Stop, outside of Fifty4 Hagley Road (54 Hagley Rd).

dndimg alt="Hagley Road Metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Hagley Rd (Apr 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There isn't much sign of a tram stop here, and they are still doing things around the tracks.

dndimg alt="Hagley Road Metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Hagley Rd (Apr 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The site is just outside of Barclays Bank on the Hagley Road.

dndimg alt="Hagley Road Metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Hagley Rd (Apr 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Heading to Starbucks Coffee for a drink, there is outdoor seating (not many tables and chairs).

dndimg alt="Hagley Road Metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Hagley Rd (Apr 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

I did initially sit at a table, but started to rain, so instead crossed over the road and continued on to Five Ways Island and Broad Street. Temporary traffic lights here.

dndimg alt="Hagley Road Metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Hagley Rd (Apr 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Five Ways Tram Stop

Now on Broad Street, venues such as Cineworld and Pryzm have been closed since before the 2nd lockdown, and should be reopening by May 2021.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The crossover point on Broad Street near Pryzm, towards The Bank and The Mercian.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The other direction past Cineworld towards the Five Ways underpass, this leads to the Hagley Road in Edgbaston.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Bishopsgate Street, between Pryzm and Cineworld, has new paving. I look forward to going back to the cinema. For me it's been all Netflix and Amazon Prime Video over the 3rd lockdown.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The new Five Ways Tram Stop, with a view towards The Bank and The Mercian. Doesn't seem that long ago that you could get buses down here (more than 2 years ago now).

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Map showing the further extensions that are being built, including to Brierley Hill, Wolverhampton Station and the Eastside extension.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Another look at Five Ways Tram Stop from Broad Street. In the direction of Five Ways Island.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Brindleyplace Tram Stop

Continuing on along Broad Street. It was very quiet in the morning. The odd person or cyclist heading down here.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Also the one person on a scooter. This was near The Bank and The Mercian.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Some poles have been installed for the overhead cables on Broad Street.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Approaching the site of Brindleyplace Tram Stop, I noticed the scaffolding on the left at Ten Brindleyplace, Willmott Dixon Interiors. Sainsbury's Local was open.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (11).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Brindleyplace Tram Stop was outside of Nine Brindleyplace and Free Radio.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (12).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Beyond Brindleyplace towards The Brasshouse and The Crown (Reflex The 80's Bar) and Coyote Ugly.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (13).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Outside of The Solomon Cutler Free House was parked several Colas Rail vans. I think they were doing something near Library Tram Stop.

dndimg alt="Broad St metro extension" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WME Broad St (Apr 2021) (14).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Many of the Broad Street Walk of Stars were back on the pavement I noticed. Mostly the ones I've seen in the past.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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Elliott Brown Green travel
04 May 2021 - Elliott Brown
News & Updates

West Midlands Cycle Hire on High Street, Solihull

Remember Boris Bikes in London (aka Santander Bikes)? Well our Metro Mayor Andy Street has brought them to the West Midlands. West Midlands Cycle Hire has bikes at various points around the Metropolitan Borough of Solihull. I saw some on the Solihull High Street not far from the Masons Arms Public House. Not spotted any in Birmingham yet.

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West Midlands Cycle Hire on High Street, Solihull





Remember Boris Bikes in London (aka Santander Bikes)? Well our Metro Mayor Andy Street has brought them to the West Midlands. West Midlands Cycle Hire has bikes at various points around the Metropolitan Borough of Solihull. I saw some on the Solihull High Street not far from the Masons Arms Public House. Not spotted any in Birmingham yet.


West Midlands Cycle Hire is already available in Coventry, Stourbridge, Solihull, Sutton Coldfield and Wolverhampton. The scheme will be coming to Birmingham, Sandwell and Walsall soon. To use it, you need to download the Beryl cycle hire app from the App Store or Google Play. Use the app to unlock the bike. Ride it, later dock it, and lock it.

Use this link for the station map.

 

In Solihull Town Centre, there is 5 docking points.

  1. Station Approach (near Solihull Station)
  2. Station Road
  3. Lode Lane (near Solihull Hospital)
  4. High Street (near the Masons Arms)
  5. Malvern & Brueton Park (not far from Park Road)

 

The only location I was aware of, was at the end of High Street in Solihull. Close to New Road and St Alphege's Church. Solihull Welcomes You! Safer, Stronger Solihull.

dndimg alt="West Midlands Cycle Hire" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WM Cycle Hire Solihull High St (Apr 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

This docking point on the High Street is close to The Masons Arms.

dndimg alt="West Midlands Cycle Hire" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WM Cycle Hire Solihull High St (Apr 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

As well as Hunters. Drury Lane to the left, leads to Mell Square.

dndimg alt="West Midlands Cycle Hire" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/WM Cycle Hire Solihull High St (Apr 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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60 passion points
Elliott Brown Green travel
27 Apr 2021 - Elliott Brown
News & Updates

New blue cycle lane from Selly Oak Triangle up the Bristol Road

The final phase of extending the Selly Oak Bypass is now complete. Harborne Lane has been bi-directional to traffic since the end of October 2020, and it seems that Chapel Lane is the same. The blue cycle lane runs past the former Sainsbury's store. Beyond that is red and white bollards past the new Sainsbury's close to Selly Oak Station and the Worcester & Birmingham Canal.

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New blue cycle lane from Selly Oak Triangle up the Bristol Road





The final phase of extending the Selly Oak Bypass is now complete. Harborne Lane has been bi-directional to traffic since the end of October 2020, and it seems that Chapel Lane is the same. The blue cycle lane runs past the former Sainsbury's store. Beyond that is red and white bollards past the new Sainsbury's close to Selly Oak Station and the Worcester & Birmingham Canal.


New Blue Cycle Lane from Selly Oak Triangle along the Bristol Road

The work to extend the Selly Oak Bypass to the Bristol Road was completed at the end of 2020. A new blue cycle lane has been installed that runs down the side of the former Sainsbury's store (the plans for student flats were thankfully rejected).

 

Harborne Lane at Selly Oak Triangle

From Oak Tree Lane and Bristol Road in Selly Oak, you can see that traffic now goes in both directions, where as before it was one way. The ambulance was crossing from Oak Tree Lane to Harborne Lane.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (1).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The start of the new blue cycle lane at Selly Oak Triangle. Lots of new traffic lights and lampposts, no benches or trees at this point.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (2).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Part of the cycle lane comes from Harborne Lane.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (3).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Bristol Road towards Chapel Lane

There is a new bus lane that goes from Harborne Lane onto the Bristol Road. The bus stops have been moved to outside of the former Sainsbury's store.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (4).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Crossing over the bus lane. It all looks nice and new. Not sure if any cyclist has used it yet.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (5).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

There is still trees growing in front of the former Sainsbury's store. Re-located bus stops on the right.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (6).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

New young trees have been planted down here. Let's hope that they last and have a chance to grow.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (7).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

Frankie & Benny's ahead at the Chapel Lane junction with the Bristol Road, sadly closed down in 2020 during the previous lockdowns.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (8).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Chapel Lane at the Bristol Road junction

At the Chapel Lane junction with the Bristol Road. Before this was one way, but it is now bi-directional as well. Speed limit of 20 mph. Former Frankie & Benny's restaurant on the right.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (9).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Bristol Road beyond Chapel Lane

No longer bus stop outside of the ex Frankie & Benny's. But there is some new cycle racks. TouchBase Pears up ahead on the right.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (10).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

The pop up cycle lane that is now on the Bristol Road in Selly Oak near TouchBase Pears. Up ahead is the new Sainsbury's and Unite student accommodation at the Selly Oak Shopping Park.

dndimg alt="Selly Oak Triangle" dndsrc="../uploadedfiles/Selly Oak Triangle (Apr 2021) (11).jpg" style="width: 100%;" />

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown. Can be found on Twitter: ellrbrown

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